March 30, 2020

COVID-19: Cases in US soar past 140,000; New York State to begin testing with less intrusive test

According to CDC's update as of March 30, the case count of COVID-19 in the US stands at 140,904* cases, including 2,405 deaths, in 54 (50 states, District of Columbia, Puerto Rico, Guam, Northern Marianas, and US Virgin Islands) jurisdictions.

Breakdown of cases is as follows:

  • Travel-related : 886
  • Close contact: 2,351
  • Under investigation: 137,667

* Data include both confirmed and presumptive positive cases of COVID-19 reported to CDC or tested at CDC since January 21, 2020, with the exception of testing results for persons repatriated to the United States from Wuhan, China and Japan. State and local public health departments are now testing and publicly reporting their cases. In the event of a discrepancy between CDC cases and cases reported by state and local public health officials, data reported by states should be considered the most up to date.
 

New York

During the press briefing on March 29, Governor Andrew M. Cuomo confirmed 7,195 additional cases of COVID-19, bringing the statewide total to 59,513 confirmed cases in New York State. New York city remains the hardest-hit area reporting 33,768 cases. Governor Cuomo also confirmed that the number of deaths in the state stood at 965.

In addition, the Governor announced that New York State's Wadsworth Lab has developed a new, less intrusive test for COVID-19. According to Governor Cuomo, the new test is done through a saliva sample and a self-administered short nasal swab in the presence of a health care professional.

Additionally, health care professionals can self-administer the test without another health care professional present. He added further that this new test will help conserve personal protective equipment for healthcare workers, reduce potential exposure of the virus to health care workers and will allow the state to continue to test as many individuals as possible in New York amid the national shortage of the more intrusive nasopharyngeal swabs.

The Governor said that self-collection of nasal swabs has been done before for other respiratory viruses such as flu and it has been shown to be effective and safe, and collection of a saliva sample is simple and non-invasive. He said this new testing will begin within a week.

Governor Cuomo also announced during the press briefing that all NYS On Pause functions will be extended for the next two weeks. The Governor also directed the state nonessential workforce to continue to work from home for an additional two weeks through April 15. The state will re-evaluate after this additional two-week period.

New Jersey

As of March 29, 1 p.m, there have been 13,386 cases of COVID-19 and 161 deaths reported in the state.

On March 29, Governor Phil Murphy signed Executive Order No. 111, directing health care facilities to report daily data concerning their capacity and supplies to the New Jersey Office of Emergency Management (OEM).

Michigan

As of March 29, 10 a.m, there were 5,486 COVID-19 cases and 132 deaths reported in Michigan.

The following indicates the percentage of cases in the state by age:

  • 0 to 19 years: 1%
  • 20 to 29 years: 9%
  • 30 to 39 years: 13%
  • 40 to 49 years: 17%
  • 50 to 59 years: 20%
  • 60 to 69 years: 19%
  • 70 to 79 years: 14%
  • 80+ years: 8%

Massachusetts

As of March 29, there were 4,955 COVID-19 cases and 48 deaths reported in the state.

According to the Department of Public Health, 39,000 individuals have been tested as of March 29.

Florida

According to the Florida Department of Health, as of March 29, there were 4,950 cases and 60 deaths of COVID-19 reported in the state.

.Washington

According to the Washington State Department of Health, there were 4,896 cases and 195 deaths reported in the state as of March 28, 2020 at 11.59 p.m. According to the Department of Health, 65,462 people have been tested and of these, 7.5% were positive.

California

As of March 27, 2020, 2 p.m Pacific Daylight Time, there were a total of 4,643 positive cases and 101 deaths in California (including one non-California resident).

  • Community-acquired cases: 923 cases
  • Cases acquired through person-to-person transmission, travel (including cruise ship passengers), repatriation, or under investigation: 3,720 (this included 73 health care workers)

Ages of all confirmed positive cases:

  • Age 0-17: 54 cases
  • Age 18-49: 2,368 cases
  • Age 50-64: 1,184 cases
  • Age 65 and older: 1,016 cases
  • Unknown: 21 cases

Gender of all confirmed positive cases:

  • Female: 2,057 cases
  • Male: 2,536 cases
  • Unknown: 50 cases

Illinois

The Illinois Department of Public Health (IDPH) reported 4,596 COVID-19 cases and 65 deaths in the state as of March 29.

According to IDPH, total persons tested as of March 29 was 27,762.

States with case count in the range of 1500 to 4499 (as of March 29)

States with case count in the range of 800 to 1499 (as of March 29)

States with case count in the range of 400 to 799 (as of March 29)

States with case count in the range of 200 to 399 (as of March 29)

  • Iowa: On March 27, IDPH reported deaths of two Iowans with COVID-19 in their 60s-80s from Poweshiek and Allamakee Counties. On March 29, IDPH reported one more death in an elderly from Linn County.
  • Kansas: Governor Kelly issued a temporary statewide Stay Home order in ongoing effort to combat COVID-19 on March 28.
  • Idaho
  • Rhode Island: Rhode Island Department of Health, on March 28, reported the state's first deaths from COVID-19 in two elderly persons in their 70s-80s with underlying medical conditions. Governor, Dr. Alexander-Scott announced Stay-At-Home Order and New Travel Restrictions on March 28, as well as new travel restrictions and DMV extension on March 29
  • New Hampshire: DHHS announced the state’s second and third deaths related to COVID-19 on March 27 and March 29 respectively. The deceased were residents of Hillsborough and Rockingham Counties in their 60s, both with underlying health issues. 
  • Maine: Maine recorded the first COVID-19 related death in a man in his 80s from Cumberland County on March 27. 
  • New Mexico: On March 28, the Department of Health reported one additional death in New Mexico related to COVID-19 in a Bernalillo County resident in his 80s with multiple chronic underlying health conditions. 
  • Vermont
  • Delaware: On March 28, Delaware Division of Public Health announced three additional deaths in three males in their 70s from New Castle and Kent Counties. On March 29, public health announced another death in a 79-year-old female from New Castle County. All four individuals had underlying health conditions. Governor Carney also ordered out-of-state travelers to immediately self-quarantine for 14 days.

States with case count in the range of 100 to 199 (as of March 29)

  • Hawaii
  • Montana
  • Puerto Rico
  • West Virginia: West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources confirmed the first death in the state in an 88-year old female from Marion County on March 29.
  • Nebraska: Nebraska health department reported its first deaths on March 27 in a man in his 50s from Douglas County and a Hall County resident in her 60s; both with underlying health conditions.
  • Alaska: On March 27, Governor of Alaska issued a COVID-19 health mandate on social distancing and limiting intrastate travel.

States with case count in the range of 1 to 99 (as of March 29)

  • North Dakota: North Dakota Department of Health reported its first death related to COVID-19 on March 27 in a man in his 90s from Cass County who had underlying health conditions. 
  • South Dakota
  • Wyoming: On March 27, Governor Mark Gordon and State Health Officer Dr. Alexia Harrist extended the three existing statewide health orders.
  • Guam: Guam Department of Public Health and Social Services released the preliminary profiles of earlier confirmed cases on March 30. 
  • Virgin Islands
  • Northern Marianas: On March 28, the Office of the Governor in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands confirmed two positive cases of COVID-19 in a male and female in their 40s.
SOURCE: CDC; State Health Agencies
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